Traditional Tuesday -Sloppy Joes

Happy Tuesday!  Today’s blog will focus on one of America’s favorite childhood and even adulthood dishes – The Sloppy Joe.

After researching the history behind the staple dish, there appears to be a lot of debate regarding its origin and unfortunately I do not have the answers.

What I found in this research is that this dish was established at a cafe in the Midwest in the 1930s by a man name Joe who added tomato sauce to loose meat.  Another source says that it originated as a Cuban loose meat sandwich in Florida.  The Sloppy Joe was also even called a “Manwich”.

Well thanks to the recipe posted by Bodypotential I decided to try on the healthier version of Sloppy Joes.  This dish was healthy on a budget and serves 4 people:

1 lb. Perdue Ground Turkey = 160 calories/serving = $2.99/lb. at Stop and Shop

16 tablespoons of tomato paste = 80 calories

6 tablespoons tomato sauce = 30 calories

2 tablespoons honey = 60 calories/serving

1 tbsp. garlic powder

1 tbsp. paprika

1 tbsp. cumin

1 tbsp. chili powder

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Since I am doing this body cleanse for the next few days, the healthy sloppy joes will last me 2-4 meals either lunch or dinner.

Meatless Monday/Traditional Tuesday – Vegetarian Cee Eiw

Happy Presidents Day Weekend and Post-Valentine’s Day!! Welcome to the second Meatless Monday post and deciding to “knock two birds with one stone”, this post will discuss a traditional Thai dish that is usually made with stir fry wide noodles with soy sauce called Pad Cee Eiw.  In the attempt to create a vegetable stir fry dish using the ingredients from the Sunday Game Plan posted on SuperBowl weekend, I decided to make it my own.  This vegetarian stir fry consists of ingredients that I grew up eating with on my Filipino and Thai dishes.

Almost all Thai menus and noodle dishes in the US have misinterpreted the title of “Pad Cee Eiw”.  Pad Cee Eiw is a Thai noodle dish of Chinese origin and are relatively recent additions to the Thai culinary universe.  The dish is often made to accommodate Chinese clients and is considered a “street food” dish.

“Pad” in Thai means “stir fry” and “cee eiw” in Thai means “soy sauce”.

This is a very quick dish, but one important thing is to make sure that the wok is very hot.  Also, this dish can be gluten free if the sauces used does not contain gluten.

No Carb Pad Cee Eiw

Number of calories provided by My Fitness Pal

1 tbsp olive oil = 120 calories

2 tbsp chopped onions = 8 calories

3 cups (48 tablespoons) kale = 68 calories

1 cup spinach = 7 calories

1 cup broccoli rabe = 9 calories

1 tbsp Healthy Boy Black Soy Sauce = 40 calories

1 tbsp Kikkoman Less Sodium Soy Sauce = 10 calories

1 tbsp Datu Puti Native Vinegar (any vinegar will work) = 0 calories

1 jumbo egg, scrambled = 90 calories

Total cost of fresh ingredients: $5 (broccoli rabe, onions, spinach and kale) and the rest was on my pantry.

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Ingredients

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Add olive oil and stir fry chopped onions. Saute chopped onions for 2 minutes.

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Add chopped kale and spinach.  Saute until vegetables are wilted about 2 minutes.

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Add broccoli rabe and stir fry for another two minutes.

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Add soy sauce, black soy sauce and vinegar.  Stir and let the mixture boil until the sauce starts to thicken.

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Push vegetable and soy sauce mixture to the side and spray empty space with cooking spray.  Add egg and stir to scramble.

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Combine eggs with the vegetables.

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Transfer to the plate and serve.

 

 

Traditional Tuesday – Chicken Thighs Adobo

I know it’s officially no longer Tuesday, but I want to keep my word on posting a dish involving ingredients from the Sunday Game Plan.  One of the dishes from the Sunday Game Plan is Chicken Thigh Adobo.

Adobo is a popular dish in the Philippines.  Adobo in English means “vinegar braised”.   The main marinade of the traditional Filipino adobo dish is soy sauce and vinegar.  This dish can be made using any type of meat or even vegetables.  Personally the best adobo dish to make is pork belly, but for now, we will use chicken thighs.  Chicken thighs is a great piece of meat to cook with because it has all the flavors and juices in it.  Plus, it’s definitely healthier than pork belly.

Making this dish brings memories from my grandmother and mother who tried to pass on this family recipe.

Chicken Thighs Adobo – Serves 5

5 pieces of chicken thighs = 239 calories/piece of chicken thigh

5 tablespoons of Kikkoman Less Sodium Soy Sauce = 10 calories/tbsp.

5 tablespoons of Datu Puti Native Vinegar (any vinegar will work) = 0 calories

3 garlic cloves, sliced = 13 calories

3 bay leaves = 6 calories

1 teaspoon of ground black pepper = 4 calories

1 teaspoon of brown sugar = 17 calories

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Ingredients for marinade

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Chicken Thighs

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Combine all marinade ingredients

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Pour marinade on the chicken thighs and let it sit on room temperature for approximately 90 minutes.

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Turn the chicken thighs over and let it sit for another 90 minutes.

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After 90 minutes, turn on the heat on medium/high and let the mixture boil.  After boiling, add as much water to your preference (personally I love the marinade so I add approximately 4-6 cups of water so the mixture won’t be too concentrated).  Turn the heat on low, cover the pan and let it simmer for 30 minutes, turning once halfway.  After 30 minutes, open the pan and let it cook for another 20 minutes on low heat until the liquid is reduced.

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Transfer the chicken thighs on a plate.

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Pour the marinade over it.  This appears really greasy, but it’s the chicken fat with the marinade ingredients.  No oil was added during the entire recipe.  Serve with rice.

Current pantry: Soy sauce, native vinegar, garlic, bay leaves, ground black pepper and brown sugar.

Chicken Thighs: On sale at Stop & Shop for $0.88/lb. but it comes in 4-5 lb. packages.

Calories/serving: 289 calories.